Image Gallery

"Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue!" (July 3, 1893)

Joseph Keppler, Sr. (Austrian-American, 1838-1894), a founder of Puck, created “Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue!” as the patriotic Fourth of July centerfold for World’s Fair Puck, July 3, 1893, published at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Flagler Museum Archives.

“The Theatre Conversationalist” (January 29, 1890)

In “The Theatre Conversationalist,” published in Puck, January 29, 1890, Samuel D. Ehrhart (American, 1862-1937) proposes a comical solution to a distraction that is still common today. The cartoon parodies high culture, fashion, and invention - topics common in Puck’s pages. Collection of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, courtesy of the Flagler Museum.

"The Haunted Auto" (April 20, 1910)

“The Haunted Auto” by Alfred Zantziger Baker (American, 1870-1933), published as the cover of Puck’s April 20, 1910, issue, portrays the reckless operator of a relatively new invention, the automobile, being haunted by the ghosts of animals he has killed. Collection of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, courtesy of the Flagler Museum.

An early Puck masthead

An early Puck masthead designed by Joseph Keppler, Sr. (American, 1838-1894), featuring the character Puck and his famous observation, “What fools these mortals be!” Named after Shakespeare’s mischievous sprite in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Puck was often depicted in the magazine’s cartoons pointing out the errors – or foolishness – of man’s ways. Flagler Museum Archives.

"Fair Warning" (June 7, 1911)

“Fair Warning” by Samuel D. Ehrhart (American, 1862-1933), published in Puck, June 7, 1911, is a commentary on corruption among New York City policemen in the early 20th century. Collection of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, courtesy of the Flagler Museum.

The cover of the March 26, 1902 issue of Puck.

Puck’s artists created colorful covers for every issue that depicted biting or whimsical commentary on current events. The March 26, 1902 issue features a humorous Easter scene by Louis M. Glackens (American, 1866-1933). Flagler Museum Archives.

"An After-Dinner Speaker" (October 8, 1890)

This visual pun by Samuel D. Ehrhart (American, 1862-1937), “An After-Dinner Speaker,” was published in Puck, October 8, 1890, as part of the series “Puck’s Illustrated Definitions.” Collection of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, courtesy of the Flagler Museum.

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