May 28, 2012

A Real Tiffany Dome

0 comments

The stained glass dome in the Driehaus Museum, attributed to Giannini & Hilgart. The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

Is it a Tiffany?

As my tour group and I, necks craned, watch sunlight streaming through the colorful stained glass in the Driehaus Museum sculpture gallery’s dome, this is one of the few times in the Museum that I must answer: “Nope.”

Our glass dome, which features four trees forming an autumnal canopy against the sky, was installed during the George Washington Maher redesign of the gallery in 1900, commissioned by the mansion’s second owner, Lucius G. Fisher. It is attributed to Giannini & Hilgart, an art glass design firm associated with the Prairie School.

So I usually tell the group, especially the out-of-towners, to head south and visit the Chicago Cultural Center after touring the Museum. There they can see not only a Louis C. Tiffany art glass dome, but the world’s largest Louis C. Tiffany art glass dome.

Tiffany dome in the Chicago Cultural Center
View of the dome in the Chicago Cultural Center’s Preston Bradley Hall. via

Tiffany dome in the Chicago Cultural Center, detail
Detail of the fish scale pattern depicted in art glass. via

The dome, spanning Preston Bradley Hall with a diameter of 38 feet, commands all attention despite the opulence—imported marbles inset with mosaics of mother of pearl, Favrile glass, and colored stone—of the room beneath it. Within its cast iron frame, there are 30,000 pieces of Tiffany glass, most of them arranged in intricate, turquoise-hued fish scale patterns. Those in the center converge to form signs of the zodiac.

I recently downloaded the Chicago walking tour from the Poetry Foundation to my iPod, and it starts you beneath this very dome in Preston Bradley Hall before leading you down to the Art Institute, the Fine Arts Building, and the Harold Washington Public Library. I listened to Carl Sandburg reading from “The Windy City” (“I will die as many times/as you make me over again,/says the city to the people…I am stone and steel of your sleeping numbers;/I remember all you forget./I will die as many times as you make me over again.”) while staring up at the simple, repetitive fish scales in the jewel-like glass.

The Tiffany dome underwent a restoration that was completed in 2008 (in fact, the same year the Driehaus Museum opened). If you like those epic tales of restoration and have already perused our slideshows, Explore Chicago has a detailed account of prepping, removing, restoring, and reinstalling the stained glass. The project was tackled by Botti Studio of Architectural Arts, Inc., the same Evanston-based firm that undertook the Driehaus Museum’s restoration of the Giannini & Hilgart dome. See here for the full story.


—Lindsey Howald Patton

< Back to overview

Comments:




News

January 22, 2015
Cooper Hewitt Museum embraces a multifaceted identity.

Following an $81 million makeover, the Cooper Hewitt showcases objects that are both newfangled and elegantly refined, all housed within a Neo-Georgian manse. Read more

December 12, 2014
Driehaus Museum closed for part of January

The Museum will be closed January 5-16, 2015. Read more

Featured Program

EXHIBITION PREVIEW PARTY
Thursday, February 12

Be among the first to experience the special exhibition Maker & Muse before it opens to the public. Read more

Featured Program

Love is in the air A Valentines Day Jazz Concert
Saturday, February 14

Let jazz vocalist Rose Colella serenade you this Valentine's Day. Read more

Featured Program

The Collection
Saturday, April 11

Join us for a lively discussion of The Collection which explores the glamorous world of haute couture through the eyes of a young girl working as a seamstress at one of the most intriguing fashion houses in history. Read more

Featured Program

Crab Tree Farm: Exploring the Arts and Crafts Movement
Saturday, April 18

Join us this spring for a new travel tour which takes us to Lake Bluff, Illinois to visit Crab Tree Farm, a private estate with farm buildings that display Arts and Crafts collections in settings that have been purposely designed to reflect the aesthetics of the movement. Read more